Thursday, 18 May 2017

NEAW17

This week has been the National Eosinophil Awareness Week. Largely USA driven, but in recent years following research and increased understanding into Eosinophilic Diseases there has been a strong supporting role from the UK EGID community, largely coordinated by FABED.



This year however, it's all been rather different. Supporting, treating and establishing good practice for an emergent disease is never easy. It takes individuals and teams taking a leap of faith in trying new strategies, putting their heads above the parapet and bidding for funds for research to support new theories. This last is a gargantuan task - as I've stated previously on this Blog, less that 1% of all research funding goes on gastrointestinal conditions. Absolutely NONE goes on paediatric gastrointestinal conditions. Although eosinophilic disorders do indeed affect adults (my father has EoE) adult treatments are less controversial.

In the UK, few medications are licensed for under 12s. Tertiary level consultants can, however prescribe the, - and many do, it's surprisingly common. But prescribing medication for an emergent disease in under 12s is VERY challenging, and should always be carefully monitored.

My Blog Stats bear out the fact that many come across the Recipe Resource looking for information on EGID - Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disease. I therefore feel in this week in particular I need to write something to give the little information those in the EGID community have to my readers.

Wednesday, 29 March 2017

Homity Pies - introducing Voakes Free From

This is a recipe adapted from a childhood favourite. Many years ago, at the height of the 1970s a vegetarian restaurant called "Cranks" pended in London. In the 1980s I visited with my mother, and she bought their cookbook. One of our favourites was a small "Homity Pie" which was basically potato and veg in a pastry case topped with cheese. It's still my favourite kind of food, and I decided to reinvent it for my daughter.


I've had a few wonderful mail order recommendations recently which have made my free from cooking so much easier. The first is Voakes Free From . Their sausage rolls are amazing, my youngest son loves them, and his older brother is particularly partial to their pork pies. Although there is nothing ready made my daughter can eat their pastry has been little short of a revelation.

Voakes Free From - https://www.voakesfreefrom.co.uk

Those of you trying to make MEWS and Gluten Free pastry will have had limited success I suspect, but at LAST, here is a pastry ready made, freezes well AND ROLLS BEAUTIFULLY. What is even MORE amazing, it tastes delicious too. A real winner!

I should point out here - this is neither a sponsored post or one solicited by Voakes. They don't know me or that I am writing it. I firmly believe that anyone helping life easier for those of us catering for exclusion diets deserves a huge pat on the back. It's far too easy to make sugar-loaded biscuits and cakes but free from (and not containing soya - here's looking at you Sainsbury's!!!!) savoury food that is tasty and nourishing is hard to come by. I highly recommend them - excellent service too.

So I didn't make the pastry for this recipe. And I didn't make the cheese sauce either....

Vegusto is a company I have used before, but not for some time. Their cheese has nuts in so it isn't safe for all, and some have other ingredients in which don't suit everyone, but our issue was the strong taste which I - as a true cheese love, liked - but which my daughter hated. However, children grow up and I pretended it was a new product..... and she accepted the Moo Free Sauce quite readily!

Vegusto No-Moo Cheese Sauce
I was quite keen to persevere, since unlike the milder tasting Violife cheese, Vegusto No-Moo has protein in it.

So, on to the recipe. It's really, really simple.

Method

  • Roll out the pastry and using a large cutter and a deep muffin tin, cut the pastry cases out and place in the tin wells.
  • Par-boil potatoes, cool and roughly cut into largish chunks. 
  • Part cook vegetables of your choice.
  • Mix with some cheese sauce (important the veg isn't too well cooked or it collapses at this point)
  • Fill the cases with the cases with the mixture
  • Grate some free from cheese (I did use Violife here) on top
  • Back for approx 20 mins at 180C
Tip - these don't freeze but are delicious hot! 



Suggestion :- 
I rolled another portion of pastry, filled a large pie dish and froze it in the dish (freezer proof dish). I now have a ready made case to fill with apple/other fruit or to make a savoury pie.


I cannot tell you how exciting it is to be able to handle free from pastry which doesn't keep breaking!!

Sunday, 26 February 2017

Update!


I've been quite overwhelmed with the kind messages of support after my decision yesterday to delete The Recipe Resource and say goodbye.

In many respects, I do feel that there are other blogs which offer more, certainly which are updated more often than mine is now! However as a bank of recipes for those struggling on limited diets I hope it is still useful.

So I have been persuaded to "undelete" it (is there such a word?!) and it will stay. Who knows, it might one day get a facelift but for now it's here as a resource for those of you navigating feeding children on restricted diets.

The reason I started the Recipe Resource was to help others - and for that reason I've resurrected it. I'm immensely grateful to all my readers for their ongoing support!

This cupcake is from the Organ Chocolate Cake mix, made as cupcakes today. I really rate the mix, the cake came out evenly cooked and springy.  A big success.


Monday, 14 November 2016

Chocolate Banana Bread

This is not a recipe I created from scratch, rather I adapted slightly a recipe in Pippa Kendrick's "Free From food for Family and Friends" book. I highly recommend it, it's given me lots of new ideas!

This is nut free, gluten free, vegan, soya free, yeast free and really, really tasty. I've made it twice now and it works best in the food processor rather than my Kenwood mixer, since the batter needs to be quite smooth.



Friday, 4 November 2016

Slow hand clap to the Food Standards Agency...

You know that popular meme of someone staring at a computer late into the night? Can't go to bed because "someone is wrong on the internet"? Quite appropriate..... except it's not bedtime and I *should* be focussing on the kids' homework, the child who is on the loo (he won't be going anywhere for around 45 minutes though, but then that's non IgE allergies for you...) and the fact that after the week I've had it really *is* Wine O'Clock and this could wait.

Except it can't.      

Myself and many, many others, from Fabed, National Allergy Strategy Group, Adam Fox and his team of paediatric Allergists and Allergy nurses, based at St Thomas's hospital, numerous paediatric gastroenterologists here and abroad plus parents dealing with the reality of life with non IgE food allergies have spent years campaigning to increase awareness and understanding amongst health professionals, teachers and communities that food allergy is not confined to an acute IgE episode. 

I wrote about the desperate need for increased awareness here . You would be *stunned* to know how many parents I know who have encountered health professionals who still simply do not understand how delayed allergic responses work, what FPIES and EGID are, or how cell mediated gut allergic responses cannot be tested for. The numbers of families damaged by poor or indifferent care, or those with little support for children at school, and even those hounded by Social Services because community professionals just don't "get" non Ige allergies. I've attended meetings for the All Party Group on Allergy before, and there are increasing numbers of people appreciating these issues - then the FSA railroads over all recent work in one ridiculous picture.





Yup, they've attempted to differentiate between food allergies and intolerances by reaction time, not even mentioning non IgE allergies. There is so much wrong with this I scarcely know where to start. Their sole defence is that they are trying to "simplify" things. But that's like listing a simplified list of political parties in Britain as Labour and the Conservatives. It's not simple, it's simply WRONG. it helps no one and subtley erodes the hard-won gains made by those of us trying to bring hope for our children.

If my daughter has half a slice of gluten free bread with egg in she becomes unwell several hours later and the response lasts days. If she has the tiniest amount of soya the entire response process which includes soiling and bleeding lasts up to a month. Just where on that chart would she fit? Or her twin brother who has long term bowel damage from non IgE symptoms and narrowly escaped surgical intervention years ago, whose non IgE allergic gut reaction to wheat in particular accumulates over days and weeks.

This isn't a simplified chart, it's an exclusive one, which excludes a significant proportion of those with food allergies. 

We have to contend with the media spouting about the middle class disease that is food allergies, who never stop to think of the opportunity such an editorial presents for education, for explanation and enlightenment. I've contributed myself as a lay person to publications on allergy, which fail to accurately detail non IgE food allergies. Yet still the ignorance persists.

It's not even particularly new information. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE) has had their own chart since February 2011, which is here. THEIR chart is reproduced below. It's a bit small, but that's because you just cannot over simplify this, at least not in the way the FSA are attempting to.



So what *are* non-IgE Allergies?

Non IgE food allergies DO involve the immune system, but locally, in the gut. It is a cell mediated response rather than a systemic, whole body reaction. It isn't immediately life threatening, but the long term impact ca be significant. t is a local reaction and is rarely possible to test for. Gut allergies are often delayed, which is why food allergies are so traumatic and difficult to manage, requiring strict exclusion diets to determine responses to possible triggers. Imagine an eczema reaction in the gut - it's a localised response to an allergen (or a false allergen which the body responds inappropriately to) and causes a localised problem - no anaphylaxis, no outside response (although IgE responses are often present in addition in those with gut allergies) and is very difficult to diagnose. Wikipedia actually explains this very well here . Like I said, it isn't new, and there is NO excuse for the FSA being so slapdash.

So my advice to them is to get with the programme. Work IN the 21st Century, add a third column and revise your information. Or delete it completely, because quite honestly, you've just shown yourself to be out of date, out of touch and under-informed. Unfortunately though, that picture has probably done more damage than the impact its had on your reputation.  





SaveSave

Wednesday, 26 October 2016

Socca bread (Farinata)

Reading through the fabulous "Free From Food for Family and Friends" by Pippa Kendrick, I came across "Socca bread", made from only gram (chickpea) flour, olive oil and water. This was a fabulous discovery, since chickpeas are one of the few protein rich foods my daughter can currently have!

I did some research on the internet, since the roasted vegetable version Pippa has wouldn't have been possible for us, and discovered it is really, really versatile! In France it is known as Socca bread, in Italy it is called Farinata.

You make it exceedingly thin, like pancakes - there is a great recipe here.

Alternatively, you can bake it deeper to make a more filling bread, which is what we decided to do.

Ingredients
  • 150g Gram Flour
  • 3 tbsp Olive Oil
  • 250ml water
  • Pinch of salt
Method
  • Sift the gram flour into a mixing bowl. (Gram flour tends to settle and get lumpy.)
  • Whisk in the olive oil and water until completely smooth
  • Apparently the batter should ideally sit for at least 1-2 hours before cooking.
  • Pour into a flan dish for a thick bread
  • Bake at 180C for apprize 30 minutes until cooked.
  • Cut into wedges and serve!


Tip: This is so versatile, you can add roasted vegetables, olives, caramelised onions, bake it thin like a pizza or thick like a bread. It can be pitta bread texture or soft wedges. You choose!


UPDATE

Today I tried a thinner version of the batter, with just a little more water, and it made a lovely pancake. When the batter started to cook I added roasted courgettes, carrots and puy lentils to half and flipped it over. Apparently it was delicious!


Friday, 30 September 2016

Egg Substitutions!

So, we are officially egg free and I must say it's a bit of a steep learning curve. We have previously always been advised to keep the twins on eggs and it has been a valuable source of protein. Substituting that on a dairy and soya free diet is hard, especially when you have a vegetarian who is now pretty much vegan due to allergies to feed....

Because we hadn't trialled egg replacer, I have been using pear puree instead, which I was hugely sceptical about. However, I have had considerable success - although I seriously doubt I could substitute more than a single egg successfully this way.

I've come across several ideas for egg substitution, all work slightly differently with varied results.

  • Chia seeds soaked in water make an excellent binding agent, but not the best raising agent. 
  • Soy is not an option for us - and many others too, so I haven't tested this.
  • Ripe banana works in a similar way to the pear puree we've tried, and since we have passed the banana trial this is my fall back option! This banana muffin recipe only has one egg in because the bananas act as a raising agent too, and could be easily substituted unlike recipes which contain several eggs.
  • Ground flax seeds apparently give quite an earthy texture, and can be heavy - but many recommend them.
  • Applesauce - again, like the other fruit options it works, but perhaps not for more than one egg.
  • Egg Replacer - I trialled Organ's egg replacer with my daughter last night. Not brilliant, a bit heavy but ok.  She prefers the pear option!
  • Go without!! This recipe really works and as a large cake recipe is virtually unbeatable as an egg free option. Also, research "Crazy Cake" which is very similar, these recipes are from the days when rationing and scarcity made egg-free recipes a necessity.

The chart below is widely available on different sites and has more ideas.



It's really a case of trial and error. I've made these pancakes very successfully with a pot of pear puree, you cannot taste the pear and they rise beautifully. 



The following has even more helpful information, I've discovered you really have to bite the bullet and just experiment, and also try new ways of doing things that just don't use eggs. Good luck!



SaveSave
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...